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Emmanuelle Alt is French Vogue editor

After the surprise departure of Carine Roitfeld last month, it has been announced today that Emmanuelle Alt has been appointed the new editor-in-chief of French Vogue. Alt takes the position after a decade at Condé Nast’s Paris operation, where she is credited with styling some of the magazine’s most memorable spreads.

Alt began her career in 1990 at Elle, becoming fashion director aged 20 – which is my age and impossibly depressing – before undertaking the same role at Mixte. The 43-year-old fashion journalist joined French Vogue in late 2000, months before Roitfeld, after being recruited by Condé Nast International’s chairman, Jonathan Newhouse.

“Vogue Paris is performing strongly and I wish to entrust the editor-in-chief position to someone who will ensure a certain continuity, while bringing a new energy and dimension,” Xavier Romatet, president of Condé Nast France, said. “Emmanuelle has all the professional and personal qualities required to maintain Vogue Paris as a world reference among fashion magazines. Vogue Paris will remain the most important fashion, beauty and cultural magazine, working with the world’s greatest photographers and stylists, who Emmanuelle knows perfectly. I totally trust her to manage this prestigious brand and develop it in all its dimensions, including digital.”

Alt said, “It’s a great honour for me, but also a great pleasure to get to the head of Vogue Paris that I know very well. I will try to develop the incredible potential of Vogue Paris while working with very talented teams.”

Emmanuelle will work in close collaboration with Olivier Lalanne, deputy editor-in-chief of Vogue Paris, whose field of responsibility is widened. Lalanne will also oversee the editorial direction of the magazine Vogue Hommes International.

Tom Ford responds to Roitfeld speculation

Tom Ford has put an end to rumours that his long-term friend Carine Roitfeld will be joining him in a new collaborative venture, despite online rumours.

“Carine and I have no plans to work together at the moment, and it is nothing that we have even discussed, but of course I think she is brilliant and we are close friends so who knows about the future,” Ford tells The New York Times.

Roitfeld announced her decision to leave Vogue Paris on Friday after ten years of service.

Carine Roitfeld Resigns from French Vogue

After 10 years as editor of French Vogue, Carine Roitfeld, who was tipped to take over from Anna Wintour at US Vogue, has announced today that she has resigned.

She will leave the magazine at the end of January to pursue “personal projects”.

Jonathan Newhouse, CEO of Condé Nast International, told the press: “It is impossible to overstate Carine’s powerful contribution to Vogue and to the fields of fashion and magazine publishing. Under her direction, Vogue Paris received record levels of circulation, advertising and editorial success. Vogue Paris has established itself as one of the most iconic magazines in the world, with huge influence in the field of fashion and photography.”

“Carine herself has become widely known as a beacon of style, fulfilling the role with charm and graciousness. She has become a giant in her profession,” Newhouse continued to say. “Carine will be deeply missed. I am extremely grateful to her for what she has achieved.”

Roitfeld’s replacement will be announced in the coming weeks.

*Updated article coming soon*

Outrage over Vogue photographs

French Vogue has never been one to tiptoe around controversy. Recently it has published photos of supposedly pregnant models puffing cigarettes [see pictures to the right], supporting devil worshipping and leather-clad glamazons kissing with blood pouring from their mouths.

Now, though, the magazine may have gone too far for even the most dedicated followers of fashion. Its October edition features pictures of Dutch model Lara Stone in which the naturally pale-skinned blonde’s face and body are painted black. The photo shoot, styled by the magazine’s long-time editor, Carine Roitfeld, provoked outrage today as its subject spread through internet forums and fashion websites. The US blog Jezebel criticised the decision of Roitfeld and photographer Steven Klein to alter the model’s skin colour, accusing them of cultural insensitivity.

“What Klein and Roitfeld should know … is that painting white people black for the entertainment of other white people is offensive in ways that stand entirely apart from cultural context,” it said. “France and Australia may not have the United States’ particular history of minstrel shows … but something about the act of portraying a white woman as black ought to sound an alarm, somewhere.”

French Vogue said the magazine was unaware of any controversy. Neither Roitfeld nor Stone’s agents at the IMG model agency in New York or Paris were available for comment.

Dominique Sopo, president of the French organisation SOS Racisme, said that even if the shoot was not racist in intention it was certainly “tactless”.
“If the aim was artistic, and not to pass off the model as a black girl, the fact that it produces such reactions shows that the world of images – advertising, fashion, whatever – is now paying for its long tradition of not allowing black people to show their bodies in public.”

Before starting this blog, perhaps in my naivety, I didn’t realise just how political fashion was and how many people it’s capable of offending. I suppose the clue is in the name; people are worried that behaviour they deem offensive will become “fashionable” and therefore acceptable.

It never seizes to amaze me at how diverse the fashion industry is (business, politics, creative) and how much it affects us; that selling clothes can cause so much controversy, how the clothes are made can cause so much controversy, that a picture can cause so much controversy.